Brook Minner to Lead NHF

Jan
12
Submitted by David

NHF’s Board of Directors has chosen Brook Ewing Minner to become its new Executive Director, succeeding David S. Weiss in March.  Minner, who holds a Master of Library Science degree, has most recently served as Director of the Northeast Harbor Library on Mt Desert Island, Maine. “We are thrilled that Brook will lead Northeast Historic Film at this pivotal moment for moving images and culture,” says Richard Rosen, NHF Board President.  "She has a strong vision for partnerships and for making the most of Northeast Historic Film’s many assets, which include our talented staff and deep collections.” 

Click on the headline to read the January 12, 2015 press release.

 

NEW EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR FOR NORTHEAST HISTORIC FILM
Northeast Historic Film, northern New England’s moving image archives,  announced on Monday that the nonprofit organization’s Board of Directors has chosen Brook Ewing Minner to become its new Executive Director, succeeding founding Executive Director David S. Weiss.  Brook Minner, who holds a Master of Library Science degree, has most recently served as Director of the Northeast Harbor Library on Mt Desert Island, Maine. In March, Ms. Minner will take over leadership of Northeast Historic Film (NHF), known for care of the moving image heritage of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachusetts.  

 

“I and the Board of Directors of Northeast Historic Film are thrilled that Brook will lead Northeast Historic Film at this pivotal moment for moving images and culture,” says Richard Rosen, NHF Board President.  “In a national search that identified numerous interested and highly qualified candidates, Brook stands above the rest for her excitement about the changing landscape of library and archives technology.  She has a strong vision for partnerships and for making the most of Northeast Historic Film’s many assets, which include our talented staff and deep collections.” 

Ms. Minner, a member of the Maine InfoNet board and honored as an American Library Association Emerging Leader, says, "It's a great honor to follow David Weiss, who developed Northeast Historic Film from an idea to a leading regional moving image archives. The many people who understand the vitality of film and video as central to our heritage are the engine for Northeast Historic Film's success." 

A graduate of Agnes Scott College (Georgia) with a degree in History, and an MLS degree from Southern Connecticut State University, Minner and her husband, Mark Eastman, live with their daughter in Ellsworth, Maine.  

Northeast Historic Film’s nearly 30-year investment in regional moving image preservation may be seen in the three-story cold storage building that is part of the conservation center facility in the Penobscot River town of Bucksport. There, the archives stores over 10 million feet of film and 10,000 hours of video. It is the only cold-storage facility for regional media in northern New England and is part of a commitment to serving institutions and the public by preserving and sharing the history and art of the region as captured in moving images.

Since 1992, Northeast Historic Film’s primary public face has been a 1916 cinema, The Alamo Theatre, that fronts the conservation center on Main Street in Bucksport. With the end of analog media, the archives has tackled sustainable use of digital technologies. Moving image collections may be previewed here, http://oldfilm.org/collection/index.php Major collaborative projects have been funded by the Council on Library and Information Resources, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Maine Community Foundation, and the generosity of many individuals and foundations. For some examples of NHF’s holdings, see http://oldfilm.org/content/hancock-county-maine-century-archival-film

Chris Horak, Director of the UCLA Film & Television Archive, says, “One of the first regional moving image archives in America, Northeast Historic Film set the standard for all that followed. NHF is a national treasure.” NHF’s local commitment is an important element. The home movies, TV newsfilm, student works and other records are rooted in the communities where they were made. The Alamo Theatre, which shows popular movies every weekend, begins every show with Archival Moments, selections from the archives. www.oldfilm.org