abertin's blog

Nov
7

A Century of Movies at the Alamo: Fargo (1996) November 20 at 6pm

Submitted by abertin

Snow. Lots and lots of snow. This how Joel and Ethan Coen’s Midwestern masterpiece, Fargo, begins. At first, the only thing we can see is a blinding field of white. Then, suddenly, we begin to make out the outline of a bird flying in front of us and then a car speeding down the road. This snowy opening is probably the most apt metaphor for what it is like to watch Fargo. Just like the snow, the film itself envelops the audience in a kind of haze while at the same time revealing something unexpected out of this snowy haze.

Oct
3

A Century of Movies at the Alamo: Big (1988) October 16 at 6pm

Submitted by abertin

When I think about Big (1988), I think about the dichotomy between childhood and adulthood. It is a film that blissfully captures the youthful spirit, or “inner child”, we all are struggling to maintain, but it also captures something a little bit more universally tragic – a child’s perpetual desire to be an adult and an adult’s perpetual desire to return to childhood. This desire to be older than we are is normally our first encounter with wanting to be something other than we are and thus becomes our first experience with feeling inadequate.

Sep
6

A Century of Movies at the Alamo: Young Frankenstein (1974) September 18 at 6pm

Submitted by abertin

Dr. Frederick Frankenstein (pronounced “Fron-kon-steen”) is a neurosurgeon with only one problem – his grandfather is extremely famous for re-animating the dead – and Frederick wants absolutely nothing to do with this legacy. He is only into hard facts and legitimate science, not any of that kooky stuff like bringing people back from the dead.

Aug
8

A Century of Movies at the Alamo: The Sound of Music (1965) August 21 at 6pm

Submitted by abertin

There isn’t much I can say about the Sound of Music that hasn’t already been said. You all know the story and almost everyone has seen it or at least knows the songs (If you haven’t seen it, you must have had a wicked childhood or a miserable youth; but somewhere in your youth or childhood, you must have done something good because you get to see it now). So, if it’s okay with all of you, this month there won’t be any trivia or deep insights about the film. Instead, I’m just going to talk about what The Sound of Music means to me and hopefully what it means to you too.

Jul
5

A Century of Movies at the Alamo: Hitchcock Double Feature - Rear Window (1954) and Vertigo (1958) July 17 at 6pm

Submitted by abertin

On July 17th at 6pm, the Alamo Theatre is hosting an Alfred Hitchcock double feature of Rear Window (1954) and Vertigo (1958). July 17th is also National Ice Cream Day in the United States. Just about now, you might be thinking what does National Ice Cream Day have to do with Hitchcock? Well, let me tell you a little bit about my summer routine. The rest of the staff at NHF all know I stay pretty well-informed on the soft-serve flavor of the day offerings at the Dairy Port.

Jun
6

A Century of Movies at the Alamo: Leave Her to Heaven (1945) June 19 at 6pm

Submitted by abertin

What would you do for love? No, seriously, how far would you go? What are the limits? Those are the central questions in the film Leave Her to Heaven. When socialite Ellen Berent meets novelist Richard Harland during a train trip to New Mexico she immediately falls for him – hard. Despite her engagement to another man, Ellen and Richard soon decide to marry and thus begins their idyllic life together. Well, not quite.

Apr
5

A Century of Movies at the Alamo: Wings (1927) April 17 at 6pm

Submitted by abertin

Hi, Northeast Historic Film blog readers! This month, to get you excited about Wings (1927), the next film in our A Century of Movies at the Alamo series, we have an extra special guest blog post from our projectionist extraordinaire, the one, the only, Phil Yates! You’ve seen him wearing his Northeast Historic Film shirt around town. You’ve seen him ripping tickets at the Alamo. Now, you get to hear his thoughts on Wings!

Mar
7

A Century of Movies at the Alamo: Sherlock Holmes (1916) March 20th at 6pm

Submitted by abertin

The curved pipe, the suave dressing gown, “Elementary, my dear Watson”: all quintessentially Sherlock Holmes and all derived from one man. No, not from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; but from a man named William Gillette. William Gillette was an American stage actor, playwright, and director most prolific around the turn of the 20th century. Gillette was extremely well-respected within the theater community for his numerous roles and the plays he authored; but his most famous and most popular role was as Sherlock Holmes in a play he wrote and performed in more than 1,300 times.

Feb
23

A Century of Movies at the Alamo

Submitted by abertin

Hi Everyone. We want to announce our really exciting upcoming film series, A Century of Movies at the Alamo.

Every third Sunday of the month at 6pm from March through November, we are going to be screening a different movie from a different decade of the Alamo’s existence. Here’s the schedule:

March 20: Sherlock Holmes (1916) with live accompaniment by Jeff Rapsis
April 17: Wings (1927) with live accompaniment by Paul Sullivan
May 15: The Wizard of Oz (1939)
June 19: Leave Her to Heaven (1945)

Nov
12

Re-Visiting Old Places and Inspiring New Generations, Part II

Submitted by abertin

Hi, Northeast Historic Film blog readers! Last week, I discussed my recent visit to Colgate University to teach a film projection workshop and introduce the students to the world of film archiving, so if you are interested in any of those topics, you should check out Part I. Today, I’m going to be discussing another October trip, this time to the L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film Preservation at the George Eastman Museum. This trip, like the Colgate trip, was a return to a familiar place.

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